U.S. House passes Horse Slaughter Prevention Act

7 09 2006

Stunned, not dead

Only “stunned”, not dead, this horse had been dropped from the stun chute onto a moving platform where a hind leg has now been secured & hoisted into the air by the man in white as the horse proceeds through the slaughter plant. Link

September 7, 2006 — The U.S. House on Thursday voted 263-146 in favor of the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, which bans the slaughter of horses for human consumption.
Co-sponsored by Reps. John Sweeney (R-New York) and Ed Whitfield (R-Kentucky), the bill seeks to amend the Horse Protection Act to ban the shipping, purchasing, selling, delivering or receiving of horses to be slaughtered for human consumption. Two amendments to alter the bill failed to pass.

AQHA opposed the bill, which would if it becomes law shut down horse slaughter plants in Fort Worth and Kaufman, Texas; and DeKalb, Illinois.

An AQHA release stated, “AQHA and the Horse Welfare Council opposed the bill because of its shortcomings on a number of different fronts. The bill doesn’t offer any solutions to the 100,000 unwanted or unusable horses that are sent to slaughter facilities each year and infringes on the rights of all horse owners. Additionally, the bill does not have any oversight measures or guidelines for equine rescue operations that are expected to absorb these horses each year. AQHA supported humane transportation and treatment laws for horses bound for slaughter.

“In the end most members of Congress found it hard to vote against this bill, which was heavily lobbied for by animal rights groups and the Humane Society of the United States,” the release continued. “While AQHA does not favor slaughter over other end-of-life options, it does believe it should remain an option for owners. By passing this bill, AQHA and HWC officials believe bottom-end, unemployable and unwanted animals will suffer increased neglect and place an undue burden on state and local governments. The bill now moves on to the Senate.

A similar version of the bill, Senate Bill 1915, is currently before the Senate Commerice, Science, and Transportation Committee. The bill is co-sponsored by Sens. John Ensign (R-Nevada) and Mary Landrieu (D-Louisiana).

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11 responses

8 09 2006
RUSTY BUCKET

Thopse representatives who voted for the ban have no balls nor backbones. There’re too many bleeding hearts in this country who don’t have good sense. How many of those hollering to save the horses have no problem with killing unborn babies?
What do these wizards propose to do with those 90,000 to 100,000 extra horses every year? Their ears will never freeze as long as their heads are in their rumps.

8 09 2006
defrostindoors

Regular readers of this blog know that I am a firm advocate of RESPONSIBLE breeding. That would cut down the numbers of ‘surplus’ horses dramatically–look at the idiot QH breeder who sees nothing wrong with producing H/N horses. Look at all the people breeding parky Morgans, who can’t figure out why no one wants to pay big bucks for a ‘Morgan’ foal that looks like a Saddlebred and can’t stay sound. Look at the people who RUINED the Shetland pony. Responsible breeding would eliminate the need for such events as National Homeless Animal Day. You *are* a regular reader of this blog, aren’t you? ;)

As for abortion, great straw man! Two months early for Guy Fawkes Day! Besides, it wouldn’t hurt if people made responsible decisions in that department as well. You ought to read this.

9 09 2006
Terri

Rusty bucket, you need to get a grip on reality. Statistics were done and the 100,000 (as you say) horses that would not be slaughtered will most likely be absorbed into the population and live out their lives as they were intended. What the pro slaughter factors don’t realize is that horses are dying of natural causes, injuries and accidents, and humane euthanasia every day. This offsets any myth that the pro slaughter factors put out about the “unwanted, neglected, abused” horses that will be wandering the streets or laying dead on the road.

I agree with defrostindoors about responsible breeding. Responsible ownership also comes with that. A person who is not willing to either sell, trade, find a good home, or have his/her horse euthanized shouldn’t be owning a horse. Why should the irresponsible owners and breeders be monetarily rewarded for their careless actions? This doesn’t make sense to me at all.

To address the AQHA, the AMVA and the AEVP, the pro slaughter stance is not an accurate poll of the veterinarians across the country. There are more than we know that oppose slaughter and why wouldn’t they? This cuts into their business as well as goes against the oath that they take “do no harm”. I know quarter horse owners, paint horse owners who are opposed to slaughter also and I would guess that if 70-80% of the American public is against slaughter, a good portion of them are registered horse owners. The Quarter Horse Assn. makes money from the registration of each and every quarter horse. It doesn’t matter what happens to the horses after they are registered as long as they have members in good standing (dues paid, registration fees paid, show fees paid). The bottom line on that is the almighty dollar bill. The Cattlemen’s Assn. makes money off of each and every horse that is slaughtered so it stands to reason that they would support horse slaughter.. that’s free money in their pockets.

Oh and by the way, I agree with people making responsible decisions on their breeding as well. We are over populated and some cultures eat humans but I don’t think I’ll see the day when humans are sent to slaughter.. at least I hope not.

It’s about moral values, our heritage, and our culture that drives this issue, not to mention the love and compassion that we feel toward our pets.

I hope that this bill becomes law and I, for one, will be watching it to the finish.

28 09 2006
christine

horses are not food. Americans need to take responsibility for there horses. When a horse can’t race anymore they can become a pleasure horse, hunter, jumper, dressage horse, when they can’t jump they can do pleasure riding, trails, and begginer lessons, when they can’t do that they can be a compainion horse. and when all else fails they can be put to sleep peacfuly. breed responsibly. buy responsibly, and sell responsible. You can put in the bill opf sale the horse can not be sold later at an auction.
and what does abortion have to do with anything.

9 10 2006
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1 05 2007
lifetime horselover

Regardless of weather you are totally against horse slaughter or not, we all need to be able to take a look at this bill with an open mind. I am not saying horse slaugther should be legal, but H.R. 503 is not the answer. The ambiguous language of the bill itself is extremely flawed and could have devastating unintended purposes on the horse industry. It seeks “to prohibit the shipping, transporting, . . . to be sluaghtered for human consumption and for other purposes” What do they mean by “other purposes”? If passed this bill could prevent Americans from shipping horses for ANY reason including sales, shows, or recreational purposes. It also does not address WHAT will happen to these extra horses. I don’t think people will just accept worn out, generally worthless horses with open arms. The average cost of keeping a horse for a year is $1,825 dollars. I don’t have an extra $1,825 to spend on a horse that doesn’t do me any good. When I look at this bill and the way it is lobbied and presented, it makes me think of a bunch of dog and cat owners living in town watching the movie Flicka and thinking about how horrible horse slaughter is. I’m not saying horse slaughter is right, but HR 503 is not a solution. It is an ill planned attempt to stop horse slaughter. When I see a well organized proposition with some REAL solutions, you might find me all for it, but for now, I think the Flicka watching horse admirers should think this through a little more and come up with a more effective plan of action.

24 05 2007
CAZZA

WHY KILL HORSES THEY R DA MOST BEAUTIFUL ND LOVELY ANIMALS OF DA WRLD Y DO IT

31 01 2008
Liz

WHY? These animals are so beautiful. Every horse’s heart is pure and made of PURE GOLD. People are selfish bastards. Not you guys, but the majority of them are if they let horses be slaughtered!

23 02 2008
Caitlin

This is DISGUSTING, REPULSIVE, AND ABSURD. There is no need for use to be eating horses!!!!! What i can’t understand is how the people who do this insanity, sleep at night. You selfish, heartless, beasts !!! How could you hurt such a genital giant. I will be one of the people to help put a stop to this!!! and this won’t be the last time you hear from me regarding !!! This WILL come to an end!!!! And anyone who doesn’t stand, and make a voice for these poor horses, is as much to blame as the ass wholes doing it!!!!!!!!

17 04 2008
ME ME 900

THE PEOPLE WHO DO IT R DOING IT FOR MONEY.THEY R HATEFUL AND R MAKING HORSES GOING EXTINCT DID U KNOW ONLY A LITTLE LESS THAN 75 MILLON HORSES ARE LEFT IN THE WORLD THAT IS BAD FOR OUR WORLD WE NEED TO STAND UP FOR HORSES NOT LETING THE DIE LIKE THIS AND I CAN TELL U I BET AROUND 50 MILLON WILL BE LEFT ONCE I AM 60. WE DONT WANT THIS DO WE? US + STOPPING THE MADNESS=A GOOD LIFE AND WE WANT IT ALL (NOT THE HORSE KILLING) IF I WERE U ID GET UP AND GO LIKE I AM!!!!

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