How to rewire a model horse’s leg

30 01 2007

stablemate Morgan, originally uploaded by appaIoosa.

According to my stats, someone keeps coming to Bridlepath with that search string: “how to rewire a model horses leg“. Anyone out there actually know how to do it, so we can help this anonymous person? I was able to find this at Mane Connection:

Breyer models are made of Cellulose Acetate. The composition of cellulose acetate will not allow it to be glued with everyday adhesives like Elmers, model cement, or even Crazy Glue. For best results, you should use acetone, or an adhesive high in acetone to repair breaks. Nail polish remover, which is a dilute mixture of acetone and water, is usually too dilute to work well and should not be attempted if it contains skin softeners or moisturizers such as aloe or lanolin.Acetone can be found at hardware stores. Acetone is flammable slightly toxic and reactive to other chemicals that you may have around the house (for example hydrogen peroxide or bleach). It should be only used in a well-ventilated area and skin contact should be avoided.The following will make your broken model almost as good as new. The break point will have almost the same strength as it did before the break if the following steps are performed properly. If one of your favorite models needs surgery, it might be wise to first practice on a less favorite model to gain experience and confidence. Follow these steps to insure a good bond:

  1. Make sure that the surface of the break is clean.
  2. Put a small drop of acetone on each part and allow it to stand 10-30 seconds. Do not over apply the solvent or you risk over-softening (melting) the pieces and destroy the paint.
  3. Carefully put the two pieces together and hold for at least one minute.
  4. Let the bond set for at least an hour. Make certain that there is no pressure or strain on the broken area.

The break in a leg can be strengthen by putting a small pin in it. Drill a small hole (slightly smaller than the diameter of the pin) in one face of the break and insert the pin. Align the two pieces and press them together so that the pin makes a indentation where you should drill the hole in the in the second piece then drill the second hole.

OK, anonymous person, does that help? :)

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3 responses

8 12 2007
Linda Smith

I have tried all kinds of “glues” and of course nothing works! Right now my husband is at the hardware store looking for a shrink wrap tube to try. I am on my way to the garage in search of acetone and if it’s not there I”ll be going to the hardware store. Can’t think of a better way to spend an icy day! I’ll keep you posted.

15 08 2008
Stephanie

Very old post, but thought I would add my 2 cents as I just found it. :)

Glue will not work on cellulose acetate- as stated in the article above. I like to use a pin, normally the straight length of a paper clip with the rounded edges having been cut off. Dremel a small hole into both the body of the horse and the broken leg- the pin should fit snuggly, allowing the leg to be “pushed” back together. Once I find that this works, I pull it apart again and drip some acetone based nail polish remover (make sure it has acetone in it- not all do!) and refit the leg together allowing the plastic to meld back together. If there is a gap, perhaps even from the break, I take a small amount of epoxy and fill it in, making sure to smooth it out as best I can so that after it cures it will be easier to sand down before repainting the area to match the horse once again. :)

14 03 2009
automotive floor jacks

This is the first time I comment here and I should say you provide us genuine, and quality information for bloggers! Good job.
p.s. You have an awesome template . Where have you got it from?

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