Bridlepath Hall of Shame: Horse show mom from hell

12 09 2006

Flying Sunbeam

Timmy Clark on Flying Sunbeam, one of the alleged doping victims. The pony, which was said to be hanging its head and unsteady on its feet, was given a blood test (Jersey Evening Post)

You have to wonder what goes through some people’s minds–think how dangerous this could have been for the children and their ponies.

Shame!ONE of the most prestigious events in the Jersey showjumping calendar has been cancelled after the mother of a young competitor was accused of feeding sedatives to ponies belonging to her son’s rivals.

Police were called in after the woman was spotted giving what appeared to be white mints to five ponies waiting in the paddock on Saturday shortly before the Junior Showjumper of the Year contest.

 

The witness told officials that she went to investigate after seeing the woman try to kick a “sweet” into the dirt when one fell from a pony’s mouth.

She claims that what she found was not a mint but a powerful animal sedative called ACP or acetylpromazine.

Officials from the British Show Jumping Association were alerted and immediately cancelled the junior event in St Lawrence, Jersey, which was open to boys and girls under 16.

Blood samples were taken from the ponies and sent for analysis to the official vet for the States of Jersey.

Tess Phillips, a riding instructor whose grandson Tim Clark’s pony, Flying Sunbeam, was one of the alleged victims, said: “Timmy’s pony was hanging his head and was suddenly very unsteady on his feet. He almost fell over as we tried to guide him into the trailer.

“If it hadn’t been for the halter rope holding him up in there, Flying Sunbeam would have fallen down. We were very worried about him and I called the vet right away, who took a blood sample. We are still awaiting the results.”

The woman accused of administering the sedatives denies the allegations. She is a well-known figure in eventing, both in Jersey and the rest of Britain.

The prize money for the event was about £20. The prestige of winning is seen as the real prize.

Another local rider said: “A groggy horse could easily have fallen and caused itself injury — not to mention harmed the children.”

Jersey police confirmed that a woman was due to be questioned over allegations of horse doping. A spokeswoman said: “Blood samples have gone to our state laboratories and they are still being analysed.

“We have got someone coming into the station to be interviewed soon, but that person is coming purely voluntarily at this stage. No arrest or charges have been made.”

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8 responses

15 09 2006
shirley lewis

Hi
I am currently researching a feature on pushy parents in the equine world and am wondering if anyone has other examples of the lengths parents will go to to enable their children to win.
Also more importantly the risks they are taking safety wise. Would love tpo hear fromany concerned parents.

15 09 2006
defrostindoors

Shirley:

If you can leave contact info, I’d be happy to put this in a regular blog post.

1 10 2006
Horse news in brief « Bridlepath

[…] Ponies at the centre of the doping scandal in Jersey have all tested positive for a powerful sedative… […]

11 10 2006
raincoaster

There’s an update.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/09/13/npony13.xml

Quote:
The father of a woman accused of doping rival competitors’ ponies to help her son win a junior showjumping final angrily denied yesterday that she had fed the animals a sedative.
Basil Carré, speaking for his daughter Kim Baudains, 36, said: “We have nothing to hide and are prepared to speak to police voluntarily in order to clear this whole thing up.”
He added: “All these kids on the circuit have pushy parents. Anyone who feels they have a potentially successful jumper is going to be pushy.
“My daughter likes to be competitive as does anyone else who has a child that excels. But it would never extend to doping or doing anything illegal.” Endquote

The drug has been confirmed as ACP (acetylpromazine), and all ponies tested were positive for it. The police aren’t filing charges, because doping ponies isn’t a crime in Jersey, but the Show Jumping Association may still decide to take action. The competition has been rescheduled.

11 10 2006
defrostindoors

Raincoaster, thanks for the update! I have seen some psycho horse show parents in my time but this one surely takes the biscuit. I’m sure they’ll find some charge to hang on her; you don’t mess with ponies in Britain!

6 11 2006
The Ten Commandments for show ring parents « Bridlepath

[…] Otherwise you end up like this cow. […]

12 02 2007
vipsticks

Hey guys, there’s another English person about, 🙂
I’m a new on bridlepath.wordpress.com
looking forward to speaking to you guys soon

13 02 2007
Transylvanianhorseman

Welcome! There are still a few normal English people around. Mind you, I live abroad now.

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