Kinetic horse sculpture

24 05 2007


Thanks to raincoaster for finding the coolest stuff!

ClockworkRobot.com

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Breyer to reissue Barbaro model due to overwhelming demand

3 03 2007

Barbaro Breyer

Bowing to phenomenal demand for the critter, which had only been available from October 1 2006 to January 1 2007, Breyer announced that it will be reissuing the Barbaro model. If you missed it last time, now’s your chance.

Breyer’s Barbaro portrait model will be available for purchase through 6:00 p.m. Eastern time on April 2, 2007 at Breyer’s website at www.breyerhorses.com or call 1-800-735-9205. The price is $45 plus $8 each shipping and handling, limit two (2) per household or address. The model will begin shipping in July 2007 when Barbaro models will also be available from retailers. Ten dollars from the sale of each model will be donated to the Laminitis Fund at The University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. The Barbaro model will include a certificate of authenticity signed by trainer Michael Matz, jockey Edgar Prado, surgeon Dr. Dean Richardson and Anthony Fleischmann, President of Reeves International, Inc. Each model will have Barbaro’s name stamped on the belly in gold ink. It will be packed in a customized, four-color Breyer® box featuring pictures and the story of his career. I’d order right away if you want one. To download an order form click here: http://www.breyerhorses.com/pdf/barbaro_order.pdf

To make an additional donation to the Fund to Fight Laminitis, please visit: http://www.vet.upenn.edu/barbaro/index.html






How to rewire a model horse’s leg

30 01 2007

stablemate Morgan, originally uploaded by appaIoosa.

According to my stats, someone keeps coming to Bridlepath with that search string: “how to rewire a model horses leg“. Anyone out there actually know how to do it, so we can help this anonymous person? I was able to find this at Mane Connection:

Breyer models are made of Cellulose Acetate. The composition of cellulose acetate will not allow it to be glued with everyday adhesives like Elmers, model cement, or even Crazy Glue. For best results, you should use acetone, or an adhesive high in acetone to repair breaks. Nail polish remover, which is a dilute mixture of acetone and water, is usually too dilute to work well and should not be attempted if it contains skin softeners or moisturizers such as aloe or lanolin.Acetone can be found at hardware stores. Acetone is flammable slightly toxic and reactive to other chemicals that you may have around the house (for example hydrogen peroxide or bleach). It should be only used in a well-ventilated area and skin contact should be avoided.The following will make your broken model almost as good as new. The break point will have almost the same strength as it did before the break if the following steps are performed properly. If one of your favorite models needs surgery, it might be wise to first practice on a less favorite model to gain experience and confidence. Follow these steps to insure a good bond:

  1. Make sure that the surface of the break is clean.
  2. Put a small drop of acetone on each part and allow it to stand 10-30 seconds. Do not over apply the solvent or you risk over-softening (melting) the pieces and destroy the paint.
  3. Carefully put the two pieces together and hold for at least one minute.
  4. Let the bond set for at least an hour. Make certain that there is no pressure or strain on the broken area.

The break in a leg can be strengthen by putting a small pin in it. Drill a small hole (slightly smaller than the diameter of the pin) in one face of the break and insert the pin. Align the two pieces and press them together so that the pin makes a indentation where you should drill the hole in the in the second piece then drill the second hole.

OK, anonymous person, does that help? 🙂

Kennebec Count
Kennebec Count





Barbaro immortalized by Breyer

20 07 2006

Barbaro Breyer

Breyer has created a Barbaro model, with proceeds going to the New Bolton Center at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. You can download an order form here (it’s a PDF). The models will begin shipping October 1, 2006.








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